Peter Gutierrez’s METROPOLIS Print + Interview

Our next release is by an insanely talented young man name Peter Gutierrez. We here at Poster Collective see a TON of amazing work, obviously. It comes with the job of running a poster site, but Peter’s work was something that as soon as we saw it we knew right then we had to get him for a commission. Turns out we weren’t the only ones. By the time we talked to Peter he had actually moved out to LA from Florida and landed a design job for a major firm and rather coincidentally moved just down the street from PC’s home base. Since then he’s gone on to do some great work for the Hero Complex Gallery and now we are proud to present his first project with us – METROPOLIS.

The poster will be released for sale on Friday, April 5th HERE. Both versions (regular and gold metallic) are 4 color 18×24 screen printed on eclipse black paper and each print will be hand signed and numbered by Peter.

 

Peter Gutierrez Regular Version $30 Edition 90

SevenDeadlySins_II

Peter Gutierrez Gold Metallic $40 Edition 40

SevenDeadlySins_II

 

As always we conducted an interview with the artist about the print.

1. When we approached you to create a poster for a sci-fi film you immediately asked if you could design something for Metropolis. So, why Metropolis?
It was the first thing that came to mind.  The move is so rich in symbolism that it allows for many different explorations.  Plus I enjoy the designs throughout the film.  The movie is pretty inspiring to me, makes me want to draw.
 
2. Tell us about the concept. How did you approach the composition? Did you re-watch the film?This is a depiction of the Whore of Babylon, an allegorical figure representative of sin. It shows the Machine Maria seated on a monster, as if it where her throne  (I altered the monster a bit to look a bit more ferocious).  She is victorious over the city, the men are drooling after her. It’s the beginning of the journey from debauchery to destruction as one man says “For her – all seven deadly sins.”
I did re-watch the film.  This scene is pretty iconic though, and it struck me the first time I saw it. I knew it was definitely something I wanted to draw.
Screen Shot 2013-04-03 at 4.03.41 PM
 
3. I saw a mark up over you illustrator file, it seemed like you had a millions anchor points. Talk about your process from a technical standpoint? Do you prefer illustrator over Photoshop? Do you use a lightbox, etc?
For laughs I looked up how many anchor points I had in this file.  Over 62,000. That actually isn’t too bad though, I’ve gone over 700,000 at one point, and that’s when you get the super lag.  With so many points, if you select all, you see a block of solid color instead of the points!I don’t own a lightbox.  My process is 99% digital.  The 1% is a rough sketch I use as a guide.  I think Photoshop is built better overall, but I prefer starting in Illustrator for work like this. I like being able to manipulate my vectors and not worry to much about them becoming jagged.  Once I feel the vectors are set, I like to push it a little further with texture in Photoshop.
 
4. For you, what’s your favorite moment or line of dialogue from the film?
The scene this poster is about :)  The rhythm of several workers turning the hands of the clocks appealed to me as well.
 
5. What’s on deck for you?
Looking into being in some shows with Hero Complex Gallery.  /  Working on a mech poster series with my art group, Dynamic Rex.  /  Coming up with ideas for my own personal series (Skinmetal II)  /  Working  /  Freelancing  /  Lots of stuff to look forward to!

 

 

Here’s a little sample of his prior work:

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...